US MILITARY MEDICAL CORPS
MILITARY MEDICAL UNITS HAVE SOME NEEDS THAT ARE QUITE DIFFERNT THEN THE CIVILIAN MEDICAL CENTERS. ESPECIALLY THOSE UNDER COMBAT CONDITIONS.  THE BIG MILITARY HOSPITALES LIKE WALTER REED ARE PRETTY MUCH THE SAME AS THE CIVILIAN HOSPETAILS. BUT THE FIELD HOSPITALES ARE MORE MOBILE AND IF CONDITIONS WARENT IT THE CAN MOVE THE HOSPITAL TO A NEW LOCATION IN A MATTER OF A FEW HOURS 
U.S. ARMY MEDICAL CORPS
Marlene Dietrich, motion picture actress, autographs the cast on the leg of Tec 4 Earl E. McFarland at a United States hospital in Belgium, where she has been entertaining the GIs." Tuttle, November 24, 1944.
Private Roy Humphrey is being given blood plasma by Pfc. Harvey White, after he was wounded by shrapnel, on 9 August 1943 in Sicily." Wever.
WORLD WAR II
Medics treating a World War II soldier with face and head wounds.
KOREAN WAR
Korean-War-Helicopter-Medical-Evacuation Though the Korean War came to be regarded as a failure by many because of its unsettled conclusion, in one area it was an unreserved success: the care and treatment of wounded soldiers. In World War II, the fatality rate for seriously wounded soldiers was 4.5 percent. In the Korean War, that number was cut almost in half, to 2.5 percent. That success is attributed to the combination of the Mobile Army Surgical Hospital, or MASH unit, and the aeromedical evacuation system – the casualty evacuation (casevac) and medical evacuation (medevac) helicopter. Both had been developed and used to a limited extent prior to 1950, but it was in the Korean War that both – particularly the helicopter – came into their own, and as Army Maj. William G. Howard wrote, “Fundamentally changed the Army’s medical-evacuation doctrine.” Helicopter medevac’s transported more than 20,000 casualties during the war. One pilot, 1st Lt. Joseph L. Bowler, set a record of 824 medical evacuations over a 10-month period. Another example tellingly highlights the impact of the helicopter. The Eighth Army surgeon estimated that of the 750 critically wounded soldiers evacuated on Feb. 20, 1951, half would have died if only ground transportation had been used.
Korean-War-Wounded-Soldiers Wounded American soldiers are given medical treatment at a first aid station, somewhere in Korea, July 25, 1950. National Archives photo

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SOLDIER BEING AIR EVACED BY HELOCOPTER DATE UNKNOWN PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN
GIVING A BLOOD TRANSFUSION AT A M*A*S*H UNIT IN KORA DATE UNKNOWN PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN
VIETNAM WAR
A SOLDIER BEING LOADED INTO A AMBLANCE TO BE TAKEN TO A AID STATION OR A HOSPITAL DATE UNKNOWN PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN
Lieutenant Colonel Weise was placed with the other wounded at the river for medical evacuation on May 2, 1968. Source - William Weise 
A SOLDIER STANDS GUARD WHILE MEDICS TREAT A WOUNDED SOLDIER DATE UNKNOWN PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN
U.S. AIR FORCE MEDICAL 
Col. Greg Malone, an anesthesiologist assigned to the 88th Medical Group from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, prepares medical equipment for a hysterectomy surgery during New Horizons exercise 2019 at the Linden MacKenzie Hospital in Linden, Guyana, May 27, 2019. U.S. military members provided women’s health surgical services to reduce a backlog of patients awaiting care due to Guyana’s limited medical resources. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Derek Seifert)
KOREAN WAR 1950-1953
Airmen move a wounded patient during the Korean War. Speedy evacuation by air cut the casualty death rate by half since World War II. (U.S. Air Force photo)
Airmen move a wounded patient during the Korean War. Speedy evacuation by air cut the casualty death rate by half since World War II. (U.S. Air Force photo).
casualty of the Korean War arrives in Japan aboard a U.S. Air Force C-47, July 1950. The U.S. Air Force Military Air Transport System took over moving patients. These flights were staffed by trained Air Force AE crews to safely transport casualties. (U.S. Air Force photo)
VIETNAM WAR NOV 1955 TO APR 1975 JUST SHORT OF 20 YEARS
The C-9A Nightingale, the first plane designed for aeromedical evacuation, became part of the Air Force inventory in August 1968. U.S. Air Force photo


A hovering 37th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron HH-53 helicopter lowers a U.S. Air Force pararescueman during a rescue mission in Southeast Asia, June 1970. (U.S. Air Force photo)
Pararescuemen do a "fast rope" from a hovering HH-53, used extensively during the Vietnam War for rescue of combat personnel. U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Dave Nolan
​I DIDN'T INCLUDE ANYTHING FROM WORLD WAR II BECAUSE THE AIR FORCE WAS UNDER THE ARMY UNTIL SEPTENBER 1947 
US NAVY AND  U.S. MARINE CORPS MEDICAL
Navy Hospital Corpsman Third Class Tilman J. Moses treats a wounded South Korean soldier on 5 April 1952. Moses retired from the Navy after 20 years of service that included World War II and Korea. He received three Bronze Stars for his combat action. He died at age 79 in 2005
George Lott, 22, wounded in both arms by German mortar fire, suffers as doctors mold a plaster cast to his body, 1944. Ralph Morse

Battlefield medical help for the Marines came from US Navy Corpsmen. Corpsmen had a high casualty rate, but were reliable and efficient even under the heaviest fire. Corpsmen were highly respected by the Marine infantry, living under the same conditions, exposed to the same dangers and often more.
Navy “Malaria and epidemic control unit” in Saipan, 1940s. Photo Courtesy of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Historian, Andre Sobocinski
The Navy has a severe shortage of flight medics. And the medics it does have rarely earn the paramedic qualifications that are required by the Army, Air Force and the civilian world. Scott Olson
Injured Marine Cpl. Burness Britt reacts after being lifted onto a medevac helicopter from the U.S. Army's Task Force Lift "Dust Off," Charlie Company 1-214 Aviation Regiment June 4, 2011. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus).
A flight medic hooks a hoist to a jungle penetrator carrying two Marines during a casualty evacuation exercise Feb. 5, 2015, near Camp Buehring, Kuwait. (Minnesota Army National Guard photo by Spc. Jess Nemec/Marine Corps) Rising adversaries like Russia, China and North Korea are investing heavily in new missile technology and advanced weapon systems to contest the U.S. in hot spots and choke points around the globe. 
IT WAS VERY HARD TO FIND ANYTHING THAT WASN'T COPYWRITED FOR NAVY AND MARINE MEDICAL
U.S. COAST GUARD MEDICAL
Office of Operational Medicine and Quality Improvement Division (CG-1121) The Operational Medicine and Quality Improvement Division is dedicated to improving Coast Guard readiness through the following programs: Operational Medicine Programs AIG Messages/Admin OIX Messages, Aviation Medicine,  Boat Dunker, CBR-D Medicine, CG PHS Liaison, CG Auxiliary Health Care, Dental, Deployment Health, Dive Medicine Update
Emergency Medical Services (EMS), Gratuitous Service Agreement,
Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA),
IPAA and Health Information Privacy, Individual Medical Readiness,
Medical Training, Periodic Health Assessment (PHA), Pharmacy,
Physician Assistant Program, Physician Recruiting, Preventive Medicine
Psychological Health & Traumatic Brain Injury Program, Quality Improvement (QI) Program.
Wounded US Marines moved by the US Coast Guard sailors on landing craft on Iwo Jima WWII Working uniform 
PHARMACY
MEDEVAC
HEALTH SERVICES