TRIBUTE TO OUR MEN AND WOMEN SERVING IN IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN AND THE REST OF THE WORLD

We mustn't forget those that are following the orders of their commander in chief in this battle with terror and oppression. I would like to personally thank each and every one of them for doing what has needed to be done from the time this great country became a nation of it's own.
We should honor all of our men and women in the service of our country but those whose lives are put in jeopardy especially. We should keep all of them and their families in our prayers and wish them a safe return. We should never criticize the military of our country because they are only doing what our government tells them they must. When we don't agree with our officials in government we can use our votes to remove them and put those in that will do the will of the majority.

How soon we forget why we fought in World War One and World War Two. Both times the government listened to the people and cut our armed services to the point that we were caught with our paints down.

Now once again the call is going out for us to help our neighbors in their fight against tyranny and if we don't respond we may once again find ourselves the next target. Have we forgotten so soon what happened on September 11, 2001?

Our soldiers have been called every name under the sun. From "baby killers to war mongers". No one in the service of our country hates war more then the average soldier. We hate it because we see our buddies and innocent people killed by the people that we are really fighting. Many times the enemy will use children and innocent civilians as human shields. If it comes to kill or be killed the soldier has no choice but to fire on the enemy even if it means killing someone who is a hostage. In war the enemy doesn't want to negotiate and wont. His only response is to shoot and to kill any and as many of his enemies he can. Our fighting men try to save lives at the risk of their own.  I wish I could obtain permission to put photos taken in these countries but was told when I asked permission to post them on my site from the Associated Press I was told  that I would have to pay $150 per photo to do so. If any one sends me any photo to go with this please make sure they were taken by the service men and women themselves and they have a release to post them. I will need a caption saying where the photo was taken and by whom. Right now all of the photo from Iraq were taken in the year of 2003. No one knows how long we will be in these two countries or if it will spread to other countries that shield the leaders and terrorist.  


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Baker Company part of the only Marine Infantry Battalion left in Iraq 2003 showing they remember
Photo 1stSgt Dave Jobe 'Baker 8'
Spc. Clark Clark of the 690th Medical Company assists Arkan Sebahr (an Iraqi nurse) administer a vaccination durring National Immunization Day in Ba'Quba, Iraq on 22 September 2003. The National Immunization Day is a joint operation to assist local doctors to vaccinate the populace of Iraq as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Operation Iraqi Freedom is the multinational coalition effort to liberate the Iraqi people, eliminate Iraq's weapons of mass destruction and end the regime of Saddam Hussein. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Malachi Fields)
On September 24, 2003, US and Romanian troops from Kandahar Army Airfield, Afghanistan visited the village of Kalagai to offer medical assistance and provide humanitarian aid to the villagers during a Combined Medical Assistance Exercise (CMAX). Sergeant First Class John LeClair with the 10th Mountain Forward Support Battalion hands a balloon made with a plastic glove to one of children in the village of Kalagai. (US Army Photo by PFC Hugo A. Baray-Vasquez)
Maj. Gen. David Petraeus, Commander of the 101st Airborne Division, and Syrian officials open an oil pump valve in Mosul, Iraq, signifying the start of Iraqi oil flow to Syria, Sept. 6, 2003. (DoD photo by Sgt. Curtis Hargrave, U.S. Army)
A Kuchi Tribesman expresses his appreciation after receiving a blanket from Combined Joint Civil Military Operations Task Force members during a humanitarian aid visit to Gardez, Afghanistan, Aug. 23, 2003. (DoD photo by Sgt. 1st Class Larry E. Johns, U.S. Army)
Pfc. Troy Tarazon, a medical technician with Task Force 163, immunizes a young Iraqi girl in Kirkuk, Iraq, Aug. 23, 2003. In an effort to support local communities, Coalition forces are assisting doctors during the nation's monthly immunization day. (DoD photo by Staff Sgt. Lee A Osberry Jr., U.S. Air Force)
Staff Sgt. Alden Morrow with the 202 Red Horse Squadron, Camp Blanding, Fla., embraces his daughter Camee Morrow in hanger 4 at MacDill AFB, Aug. 18, 2003, after returning from his units deployment in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Chad Chisholm)
Col. Sam Holloway, Division Support Commander for the 101st Airborne Division, and Talal Al-Khalidi, a town councilman, cut a ribbon inaugurating the new athletic stadium in Mosul, Iraq, July 23, 2003. (DoD photo by Sgt. Curtis Hargrave, U.S. Army)
1st Lt. James Mitchell, with the 10th Mountain Division, Forward Support Battalion, examines a baby during a Team Village visit to Dah Masazo Kalay, Afghanistan, Aug. 21, 2003. Team Village is a Coalition Forces program providing humanitarian assistance to the region. DoD photo by Pfc. Hugo A. Baray-Vasquez, U.S. Army
Steve Liewer / S&S
These children were among dozens who turned out to greet American soldiers when they stopped in the village of Kvost-Ab last week. The soldiers from the 82nd Airborne Division had been prepared for trouble because a U.S. soldier had been shot while on patrol near the village in June. But children and adults greeted them warmly.

Soldiers from the 115th Military Police Company, a National Guard unit from Cranston, RI, take a break in the shade during a raid in Falluja, Iraq, during Operation Iraqi Freedom. This raid is conducted following reports of Rocket Propelled Grenades being stored at the location. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Derek Gaines)
Spc. Chris Morrone of 3rd Battalion 502nd Infantry Regiment (Widowmaker), 2nd Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) talks with children in Mosul, Iraq, during Operation Iraqi Freedom on July 14, 2003. (U.S. Army photo by Pvt. 2nd Class Daniel D. Meacham)
An Iraqi man rests next to his heard in the northern city of Kirkuk, Iraq, June 12, 2003. The sheep hearders are a common site throughout the city. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. James A. Williams)
Maj. Tim Downs of the 401st Civil Affairs Batallion hands an Ibanez electric guitar, donated by various music organizations in the U.S., to a music teacher at a music school located in Kabul, Afghanistan,July 6, 2003. The soldiers have been deployed to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Kelly Burkhart)
A ROCK PAINTING SOME WHERE IN IOWA BY RAY 'BUBBA' SORENSEN II TO HONOR OUR SERVICE MEN AND WOMEN IN OUR STRUGGLE TO KEEP AMERICA FREE.                    
A SPECIAL THANKS TO ALL OF OUR SERVICE MEN AND WOMEN AND THOSE THAT MADE THIS PAGE POSSIBLE
Marines and Soldiers from the 4th Civil Affairs Group handed out food to over a 1,000 people and medical aid to over 50 here recently in the first of many days to provide relief to local Iraqi civilians. Since the war began food and water has become scarce. Water has become extremely precious, as electricity is needed to get the water to the townships. With the electrical supply down many families are forced to drink rainwater, which can lead to medical problems such as dysentery. Photo courtesy JCCC.
Sgt. First Class Thomas Lynch, platoon sergeant, Headquarters and Headquaters Comapny, 82nd Airborne Division, hands out humanitarian rations to the residents in Central Iraq. U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Eric Foltz.
The Patriotic rock, located at the Schildberg Construction - Jefferson Quarry and painted by Ray "Bubba" Sorensen. The rock was a local graffiti rock for twenty years for the surrounding schools. Out of respect, the local students have not defaced the painting in the past five years since Bubba has been painting his tribute.

"I love my country, and I do it out of respect for the veterans."
Quoted Ray "Bubba" Sorensen II.

Bubba draws a sketch of his idea on paper and then draws the design by free hand onto the rock. This takes him anywhere from one to three weeks to paint and he has been doing it for five consecutive years. Bubba is interested in military history and gets his ideas from
books, movies, previous artwork and images by other artists.
The Patriotic rock, located at the Schildberg Construction - Jefferson Quarry and painted by Ray "Bubba" Sorensen II. The rock was a local graffiti rock for twenty years for the surrounding schools. Out of respect, the local students have not defaced the painting in the past five years since Bubba has been painting his tribute.


"I love my country, and I do it out of respect for the veterans."
Quoted Ray "Bubba" Sorensen.


Bubba draws a sketch of his idea on paper and then draws the design by free hand onto the rock. This takes him anywhere from one to three weeks to paint and he has been doing it for five consecutive years. Bubba is interested in military history and gets his ideas from
books, movies, previous artwork and images by other artists.

The rock is located on Highway 25, just 1 mile south of Interstate-80 near Greenfield, exit 86. If traveling from Greenfield junction 25 & 92, take Hwy 25 north 12 miles.
Pictures of the Patriotic Rock in 2003


REGARDLESS OF WHAT YOU THINK OF OUR GOVERNMENT AND OUR PRESIDENT.  OUR MEN AND WOMEN ARE STILL IN HARMS WAY. TO SEE HOW MANY CASULTIES THERE HAVE BEEN DURING THIS WAR GO TO THE FOLLOWING LINK.
http://www.defenselink.mil/news/casualty.pdf
THIS SITE IS UPDATED MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY AT 10:00 AM EASTERN TIME

I IMPLORE EVERYONE VISITING THIS SITE TO CONTINUE SUPPORTING OUR MILITARY WHERE EVER THEY MAY BE. PLEASE DON'T LET THEM DOWN AS WE WERE LET DOWN WHEN WE GOT BACK FROM VIETNAM. I ALSO ASK YOU TO KEEP THEM AND THEIR FAMILIES IN YOUR PRAYERS.
BOB PROCTOR.
TOP.
In Memoriam. 
SP 5 George S Gall           Oct 13,1942-May 7,2003  USAF  1960-1968       Germany,USA,Philippines Korea,Vietnam

America
What America's Future Holds for Me!
Written  by Ashley Kmetz
Age 14
(Granddaughter of George and Pauline Gall)


    America's future holds any thing anything and everything I would like it to hold for me This wonderful land we live in is full of opportunities for me as well as everyone who lives in America.  I plan to seize those opportunities. In everything  I do in my future I will try to please two things:  God and my country. As our country progresses,   I hope more Americans will become more familiar with the many honors and liberties this country provides. I am truly grateful for everyone who secured these rights and liberties for us Americans and for the people who died trying to.   The       War Veterans are my heroes because they risked their own lives for the betterment of our country.   I find that extraordinarily admirable.        
    When I think of America I think of the three unalienable Rights: Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness. America gives you the right to live comfortably. The government even provides programs for underprivileged children to go to college and have a future other than poverty. I believe every child is born a seed. They may be grown in a well-kept garden but some are thrown into the cracks of cement. Because of America, beautiful flowers can come out of cement. His or her petals may be torn and tattered but it still stands tall. I give America all the credit for those beautiful flowers. America gives you the Right of Liberty. No matter who you are or what you believe in, America gives you the freedom to fight for anything you think is right. America gives you the Pursuit of Happiness. If you live in America, you have no reason to be sad. You are living in the grandest country in the world.

    My dreams for the future can be fulfilled while living here in  America. People in other countries cannot make a lot of money or be what they want to be. For my future, I can make any amount of money or be whatever I want to be. Women and girls are shunned upon in other countries. Here women can be anything men can be. I can grow and have a family. Together we could practice whatever religion we please. In my future, I can help mold or society to become better. I can vote for, or even become, a leader in our government. I can volunteer my time to others and make their lives better.

    For generations, people have looked forward to a new century with both hope and nervousness; what will a new age bring? Faced with a mysterious future they face the thrill of possibility and the fear of the unknown. Technology has been changing the world faster than it ever has before. But, if I take care of myself, hold myself accountable for my own actions, feel a responsibility to be a productive citizen, be held responsible for my own behavior, support the betterment of mankind and bring honor to the greatest country on the face of the earth, then in my future, the sky's the limit.

   American Legion Essay Contest Winner

          Edward Ackerman Post #397

                Hellertown, PA

                    April , 2003   

  Essay and photo courtesy Pauline Gall
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IF ANYONE HAS THE INFORMATION ON THIS PHOTO PLEASE CONTACT ME AT bobp31@yahoo.com
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