PANAMA NATIONAL FLAG
PANAMA II
CAPTIN NEVIN R WILLIAMS PHOTO ALICIA WILLIAMS
ALICIA WILLLIAMS.
MAP OF THE AREA OF PANAMA WHERE FORT GULICK WAS LOCATED
Note that Gulick was on Lake Gatun. WE lived on post for a few months. The OFficers Club is where I met my Beautiful Alicia, where I proposed marriage, and where we held our wedding reception.   The club is now gone. Destroyed and replaced by a house --a Panamanian's house
Fort Gulick was one of three active military installations on the Atlantic Side of the Canal Zone in 1965. The others was Fort Davis and Fort Sherman. Gulick was the home of the US ARMY SCHOOL OF THE AMERICAS (my assignment) and the 8th Special Forces Group. The 8th SFG was later inactivated. It was replaced by a SF Battalion. Under the terms of the 1977 Treaty, Gulick was the first military installation to be turned over to Panama. The School of the Americas was moved to Fort Benning, GA and it was later re-designated the Dept of Defense Institute of Hemispheric Security. It is still at Benning with its new name. Fort Gulick is now a Panamanian town. Our old quarters were still recognizable in 2015 (our last trip) and still had the quarters # painted on it!


Last photo is the crest of the old USARSA. The School was originally known as the US ARMY CARIBBEAN SCHOOL USARSA (School of the Americas) taught military clasees to Latin American military students. All instruction was in Spanish. I was sent to Dept of Defense Language School prior to Panama assignment for 6 months of intensive language training. 6 hours of class daily and another 3 hours of preparation each night.
OUR QUARTERS 38A
Ft Sherman was the home of SHIMMY BEACH--our swimming beach and the JUNGLE OPERATIONS TRAINING CENTER. In 1964-66, JOTC was part of the School of the Americas.


THESE 3 photps show our quarters at Ft Clayton (2nd Tour 1968-1970), the carport and the street.
This was a welcoming ceremony for a Latin American dignitary at the POST OF QUARRY HTS. Ceremony represented the 4 Star general who commanded the joint command US SOUTHERN COMMAND. Commander at the time was a General Porter.

The troops were provided by the 2nd Bn, 5th US Infantry that were assigned to Ft Kobbe, on the west side of the canal. Kobbe and Howard AFB were next to each other in the same complex.
THESE PHOTOS ARE THE CANAL ZONE PACIFIC SIDE
 The last 3 photos above were taken from ANCON HILL which was in the post of QUARRY HEIGHTS. Ancon Hill had a huge US flag that was visible from most of Panama City and used to piss off the Panamanian politicians. As soon as the Canal Zone was disbanded in 1977, Panama replaced the flag with the Panamanian flag. Photos were taken from a restricted area. I could get there since I had once been the Deputy Post Commander and knew the right people!

The American name is the THATCHER FERRY BRIDGE and the Panamanians re-named it the BRIDGE OF THE AMERICAS.

The Bridge of the Americas was built by US and was the first bridge to cross the canal. Before,they had a ferry, and later a drawbridge.. Note how high this bridge had to be to allow ships to pass underneath. Since Panama took over, they have built one more bridge and have another in the works. They are also building one on the Atlantic Side which it is hoped will open the coast from Colon to Bocas del Toro to development.  

I once had a flat tire on the Bridge of the Americas and I discovered I had no jack. Fortunately, a CAL ZONE COP came by and changed tire for me!


FORT CLAYTON WAS ON THE pacific side. It was home to the 4bn 20th Infantry REgiment (Mech) and other units. I was stationed there for a year in 1969-70 with the 3rd Civil Affairs Group (ABN), I was the Group Adjutant and I also headed a Technical Assistance Team that was deployed to Nicaragua . I was the Leader of a 4 man team. We were in country for about 2 months. Clayton was the last military fort to be turned back to Panama (I should not say "back" as Panama had never had any of the zone. Correct to say "turned over."