CAMP OTSU HONOR ROLL

Former Camp Otsu soldier distinguished hero in Vietnam.
CHRISTOPHER GARLAND



You may have known Chris Garland.  He was a Corporal in the CID at Camp Otsu in the 53-55 era.  His brother, Pat Garland, a retired CID CW4 sent me the Silver Star citation order.  Please post it to the page as we may get more contacts from people knowing Chris or his wife. 
The citation followes the Social Security number has been left out.

HEADQUARTERS
4TH INFANTRY DIVISION
APO SAN FRANCISCO 96262

GENERAL ORDERS
NUMBER 46O3                           19 August 1968

1. TC 320. The following AWARD is announced:
GARLAND, CHRISTOPHER J RA12307319 (SSAN --- -- ---) SERGEANT 
FIRST CLASS E -7 United States Army, Co C, 2d Bn, 8th  Inf, 4th Inf 
Div, APO 96262 
Award: Silver Star
Date action: 6 February 1968
Theater: republic of Vietnam
Reason: For gallantry in action while conducting military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Garland distinguished himself while serving as a Platoon Sergeant with Company C, 2n Battalion, 4th Infantry Division. On 6 February 1968, Sergeant Garland's platoon was conducting a reconnaissance in force mission near Plei Gao Gen when it encountered a reinforced North Vietnamese Compani in fortified bunkers. The armored platoon was taken under fire by an extremely intense volume of small arms and automatic weapons fire coupled with the enemy's intense use of B-40 antitank rockets and mortars. After Insuring the Platoon had initiated appropriate counter-action, Sergeant Garland dismounted and, under extremely intense fire, moved to a second, temporarily disabled armord personnel carrier. Upon reaching the second vehicle he immediately reorganized the squad members and directed the moving of the wounded Personnel to the carrier. Still under heavy enemy fire, he calmly and efficiently repaired the vehicle's exposed and disabled .50 caliber machine gun. He then moved the personnel carrier through a heavy brush fire and again dismounted to recover two more wounded comrades. During the entire encounter, Sergeant Garland was under direct, extremely voluminous enemy fire.
Because of his professional and courageous acts, the enemy company was destroyed and numerous friendly lives were saved. Sergeant Garland's extraordinary heroism, superb leadership and exemplary devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States of America. 

CHRISTOPHER GARLAND,  HIS SON CHRISTOPHER JR. AND WIFE MASAE AT BIWAKO PROBABLY IN THE OMIMAIKO AREA OF THE LAKE 1954
CHRISTOPHER GARLAND JR. RETIRED FROM THE USAF AS A MSG. CHRISTOPHER III RETIRED FROM THE ARMY AS A E-7 AFTER SERVING IN KUWAIT AND AFGHANISTAN.
 PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN
CHRISTOPHER GARLAND IN OTSU 1953 OR 1954 PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN.
PICTURE OF CHRISTOPHER GARLAND VIETNAM ERA PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN
PICTURE OF CHRISTOPHER WITH HIS BROTHER PAT 1971 
PHOTO JACK GARLAND
A TRIBUTE TO CHRISTOPHER GARLAND

BY DONALD DEVANEY AND PATRICK GARLAND

Chris had retired from the Army after the Vietnam war and lived with his wife and family on Long Island.  About  2 years after retirement he went fishing with his dog in a small boat.  A sudden storm came and the boat capsized.  Chris drowned May 16, 1971 and the dog made it to shore.  So sad. For that reason Pat has always tried to reach out and find some of his acquaintances from the Japan days.  As you know we were quite rank conscious in those days, so I had no friends above the rank of PFC.  He was a Corporal and respected because he was in the CID a powerful organization in those days.  So we knew him as Corporal Garland.  He was popular because I remember on Otsu patrol and my partner and I took the Jeep to the RTO (that is what we called the train station) and Cpl Garland, his wife and a couple of kids I believe were awaiting the train for Tokyo.  It was an overnight trip in those days as I was soon to find out. 
Masae (Chris' widow) still lives on Long Island, NY. All of his children live in NY, with the exception of his eldest son, who is retired from the USAF, and lives in Florida. Chris is still my hero, after so many years. He had been awarded to Bronze Star with "V", in Korea, and another in Viet Nam, in addition to the Silver Star.  There was also a Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry, but I forget the level. It was with some sort of "Palm."  He was also entitled to 4 Purple Hearts.
One thing that I recall him telling me, was there occurred a homicide in the Otsu Area, and he was written up in a local newspaper (post or local???) about his solving of this murder.

SFC HUGH O'REILLY HOLDING ONE OF THE ORPHANES THAT HIS EFFORTS BENIFITED BETWEEN 1949 AND 1951
PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN
MR. AKIO AOYAMA A BENIFACTOR TO THE ORPHANAGE TIME UNKNOWN 
PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN
SCHOFIELD BARRACKS - 11 JULY 2006. 
DONALD DEVANEY AND RETIRED 89 YEAR OLD GERNERAL FRED WEYAND HE SAID DON HAS MORE STARS THAN HE EVER HAD.  GENERAL WEYAND WAS THE LAST COMMANDER OF MACV AND BECAME THE CHIEF OF STAFF OF THE US ARMY. HE WAS AT HUGH O'REILLY'S FUNERAL JULY 11, 2006. GENERAL WEYAND AND DON DEVANY BECAME GOOD FRIEND. HE WAS DON'S COMMANDER IN VIETNAM. 
PHOTO DON DEVANEY

TOKIKO DEVANEY DON'S WIFE WITH SMOKE SMITH AT HUGH O'REILLY'S FUNERAL ON 11 JULY 2006.
PHOTO DON DEVANEY

THE WOLFHOUNDS ARE PART OF THE 3RD STRYKER BRIGADE. THIS IS THEIR BRIGADE COMMANDER AND HIS LADY. THEY WERE AT HUGH O'REILLY'S FUNERAL.
PHOTO DON DEVANEY
HONOR GUARD FROM THE 27TH INFANTRY WOLFHOUNDS SERGAENT O'REILLY'S LAST SLAUTE 11 JULY 2006.
       PHOTO DON DEVANEY            
LTC DREW MEYEROWICH, 2ND BN 27TH INFANTRY COMMANDER LEADS THE 
WOLFHOUNDS TO HUGH'S FUNERAL ATSCHOFIELD BARRACKS 11 JULY 2006.
PHOTO DON DEVANEY


.SERGEAMT MAJOR HUGH O'REILLY, 91, WAS THE HONORAY SERGEANT MAJOR OF THE WOLFHOUNDS AND FOUNDED THE HOLY FAMILY ORPHANAGE IN OSAKA, JAPAN AFTER WORLD WAR II. THIS IRISH PIPER PLAYED DANNY BOY AND AMAZING GRACE AT THE FUNERAL.
PHOTO DON DEVANEY

SOME WOLFHOUNDS PAYING HONOR TO A REAL FALLEN HERO AND LEGEND
 AT HIS FUNERAL.
PHOTO DON DEVANEY
TOP
MURAL OF MARY AND HER CHILD CHRIST WITN WOLFHOUND REGIMENTAL CREST
PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN
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ADDED NOTE ON MR. AOYAMA
Mr. AOYAMA  (I THOUGHT HIS NAME WASS AOMORE SO NOW I HAVE DOUBLE CHECKED IT).  HE DONATED $10K A YEAR SIENCE 1992 AND HAS PLEDGED $10K A YER UNTIL HE DIES AND FOR 10 YEARS THEREAFTER TO KEEP THE LINKAGE BETWENN THE WOLFHOUNDS AND THE HOLY FAMILY ORPHANAGE, THUS HE IS "THE MAN OF STEEL".   DON
Mr. Akio Aoyama was a dear friend of my father's and was indeed a kind benefactor to the Holy Family Home. In fact his donations of $10,000 per year began in 1992 (not 50 years ago as stated on your page) and continued until a year after my father's death. At the time of my father's passing Mr Aoyama donated $100,000 to support continuation the Legacy.  This money was passed to Peace Bridge to ensure that the Legacy would endure. Since then we (Peace Bridge) have raised money through our own efforts as well as CFC (Combined Federal Campaign) donations by Wolfhounds.
Hugh O'Reilly Jr.

GENERAL FRED WEYAND WHEN HE WAS CHIEF OF STAFF
OFFICAL ARMY PHOTO
THE WOLFHOUNDS FINAL SALUTE TO HSM HUGH FRANCIS XAVIER O'REILLY AT THE SCHOFILED BARRACKS CEMETERY ON JULY 11, 2006
PHOTO BY DONALD DEVANEY


MAJOR GENERAL RALPH WISE ZWICKER
http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/rwzwicker.htm 

General Zwicker was a soldier's soldier. He cared for his men deeply. Of all of the commanding generals that I served under he beyond a doubt was the most about the people serving under him, After the chapel services he would stop and talk with anyone for as long as his time would permit.

The first time I talked with him it was after service and I had my fiancee with me. He treated her and myself as if we were equals. Asking how things were going. He asked us our names and my intentions toward my fiancee. I told him that I intended to marry her. She was Japanese and he said if anyone gave us any trouble to feel free to call his office. He would see what he could do to help as long as she passed the background investigation.
Robert Proctor

Ralph was born on 17 April 1903 in Stoughton, Wisconsin. Spending his boyhood in Wisconsin, he was the first Eagle Scout in Wisconsin. He graduated from high school in Madison and was a student in the college of engineering at the University of Wisconsin prior to entering the United States Military Academy in July 1923. Upon graduation on 14 June 1927, he was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant of infantry. Exactly one month later he married Dorothy Harriet Stewart of Madison. Together they reported to his first duty station, Fort Snelling, Minnesota and assigned to the 3rd Infantry Regiment -- "The Old Guard."

General Zwicker served in the Army for 33 years. During his career he served in command assignments from Platoon Leader to Commanding General of Divisions and Commander of Camp Kilmer. From 1954 to 1957 General Zwicker was the Commander of Southwest Command at Camp Otsu, Japan. Some of his other command positions took him to Korea and Europe.

He also served in staff position from battalions to Headquarters, Department of the Army. 

His first overseas assignment in July 1930 was at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii with the 35th Infantry Regiment of the famed 25th Infantry Division and the 11th tank Company. After his graduation from Company Officer's Course at the Infantry School, Fort Benning, Georgia in 1933, he was again assigned to the 3rd Infantry Regiment at Fort Snelling.

Following his promotion to 1st Lieutenant in July he was designated  Company Commander of one of the original Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) companies.

In 1934 he was reassigned to the United States Military Academy, where he became an instructor in the Department of Military Topography and Graphs (slang drawing).

In August 1939 he was transferred to Fort Douglas, Utah and assigned as a Company Commander to the famous 38th Infantry Regiment, which he commanded in combat 5 years later. The regiment participated actively as part of the 2nd Infantry Division (also known as the Indian Head Division) at Camp Bullis and Fort Sam Houston, Texas in training and testing the new Triangular Concept of organization.

In 1941 as a Major, Zwicker was back at Fort Benning as an instructor in the Tactics Section of the Infantry School; He also finished the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth Kansas.

During the War years he had many and rewarding assignments. He was assigned duty as the G-3 of the 94th Infantry Division from the time of its organization in September 1942 to its first large scale maneuver test in November 1943.

His next Assignment was with Headquarters, Army Ground Forces in Washington DC as assistant to the G-3 for training.

Early in May 1944 he was in England as an observer for the Commanding General, Army Ground Forces. After participation in the assault landing on Omaha Beach on D-Day, fortunate circumstances found Colonel Zwicker assigned in mid June 1944 as the Commanding Officer, of the 38th Infantry Regiment. He participated with the 2nd Infantry Division as Regimental Commander and later as Chief of Staff for the 2nd Infantry Division from October 1944 to some time in 1945.

During the period 1944 to 1945 Colonel Zwicker received the following decorations: From the V Corps He received the Silver Star. From the Commander of the 2nd Infantry Division as Commander of the 38th Infantry Division, in 1944; Legion Merit; of 3 Bronze Star Medals; and a second Legion of Merit. Colonel Zwicker was also decorated by Great Britain; General Zwicker was awarded the British DSO for Valor on D-Day in a small amphibious vehicle (DUCK) with a driver and a radio operator-he went along the shoreline of Omaha Beach. Spotting the enemy guns that were behind the original emplacement. The Germans had place powder charges in where the original gun emplacements and set them off when they fired at landing craft to decoy Naval gun fire. He was able to radio the new positions while the DUCK was under small arms fire from the Germans and the DUCK was hit several times. It had so many bullet holes that it was a miracle that anyone got out of it alive. He also received decorations from  France, Czechoslovakia and Russia.

After World War II he furthered his professional education by attending the Naval War College at Newport Rhode Island from July to December 1945. He attended the National War College from August 1946 to June 1947.

Colonel Zwicker was the assistant Chief of Staff for Operations at Headquarters Army Ground Forces, Washington DC, from December 1945 to August 1946. 

Colonel Zwicker was assigned to Operation and Training
Division of the Army General Staff from June 1947 to April 1949. At that time he was appointed as Deputy to The Chief of Staff for Civilian Component Affairs from April 1949 to July 1949. That is when he was transferred to the European Command Headquarters as Deputy Director of Operations and Training Division. After 2 years in this assignment, he was assigned for the next 2 years as Commander of the 18th Infantry Regiment of the 1st Infantry Division.

Colonel Zwicker returned to the United Stated in 1952. He was assigned as an instructor at the National War College.

In February 1953 he was assigned to Indiantown Gap Military Reservation, Pennsylvania as Assistant Division Commander of the 5th Infantry Division and promoted to Brigadier General in March 1953.

After a year of being the Commander of Camp Kilmer, New Jersey, he was sent to Japan in October 1954. When he arrived in japan he was made Commander of Southwestern Command AFFE. He remained Commander of Southwestern Command until it was deactivated in March 1956. He was than assigned as G-1 of AFFE/Eight Army and remained in this position until his promotion to Major General in May 1957. 

After his promotion he was assigned as Commanding General of the 24th Infantry Division in Korea. He remained the Commanding General of the 24th Infantry Division until it was deactivated in 1958 and its duties turned over to the 1st Calvary Division and he became the Commanding General of the 1st. Calvary Division.

In May 1958 he was made Commanding General of the XX United States Army Corps (Reserve) headquarters at Fort Hayes, Ohio. His duties included Command, Training and Support of the US Army Reserve and ROTC programs in Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia. Major General Ralph W. Zwicker retired from the Army Disabled 1 May 1960.

Major General Ralph Wise Zwicker passed away at a nursing home in Virgina 9 August 1991. He had been in the nursing home for 2 years and passed away from a heart ailment at the age of 88. Rest in peace good and faithful soldier.

He is survived by 2 sons and a daughter, his sons Lieutenant Colonel  Ralph L. Zwicker US Army Retired and Richard H. Zwicker, daughter Jean Z. Durant. His wife Dorothy preceded him in passing in 1985.

Thanks to LTC Ralph L Zwicker and Donald Devaney for their contribution that makes this tribute possible.  

Hi bob, just went back to the Camp Otsu sites to go down memory lane. Thought I would pass on a funny thing that happen to me concerning Gen Zwicker.
I was at Camp Otsu when he arrived. I worked at the afrn transmitter down in the signal repair center. Gen. Zwicker had just gotten his household goods from his last assignment and he had brought his tv in to us to look at it. He thought something was wrong with it. When I came to work i saw a guy bent over looking at a big box and I thought it it one of the guys who worked with me. I put a cigarette in my mouth and walked up to the guy and slapped him on the butt and asked did he have a light. Well, when he straightened up and turned around, all I saw was stars all over the place. He looked at me and died laughing. He said that the expression on my face was the most terrified look he had ever seen on a person. After I regain my ability to speak I tried my best to apologize and he laughed harder. Needless to say I didnt go in front of the firing squad and all worked out fine. He left the tv there and it was checked and returned to him. About 3 weeks later a package containg 2 bottles of Johnny Walker arrived from him for us. He thanked us for looking at his tv.
Bill Harper.
 
FOUR PHOTOS OF GENERAL RALPH W. ZWICKER DATES UNKNOWN
NEWS PHOTOS 

SERGEANT MAJOR  HUGH 0'REILLY
IN HONOR OF A TRUE HERO

Master Sergeant Hugh O’Reilly was made famous by an article in the New Yorker.  The article was titled “The Gentle Wolfhound.”  The short story was later made into a movie, “Three Stripes in the Sun,” released in 1955 staring Aldo Ray as MSgt Hugh O”Reilly.

When he was assigned to  the Wolfhounds of the 25th Infantry Division near Osaka Japan he was very angry about the assignment.  He had a dislike for the Japanese people because of the war.  It was after he met a little Japanese orphan boy named Chiyaki that reminded him of his own childhood that his heart was softened.  Because of this he desired to help the orphans with the encouragement of the Wolfhound’s  clerk and  interpreter, Yuko, who later became his wife.  While he was stationed with the 27th Regiment of the 25th Infantry Division the Korean War broke out.  The whole unit was deployed to Korea.  He and Corporal Muhlendorf and another man were manning a mortar position when he and Muhlendorf were wounded by a mortar round.  The third man had gone back for more ammunition and was not hurt.  They were shipped back to Japan and hospitalized near  Osaka.    

The  1955  movie, “Three Stripes in the Sun”  filmed on location at Camp Otsu about 60 minutes from Osaka.  They used a hotel operated by the US Special Services to be the hospital  scene.  The original hotel is still there but a new hotel has been built and it is also named the Biwako Hotel.  It is just a little southeast of the original Biwako Hotel.

The city of Osaka honored MSgt O’Reilly for his work in building a new orphanage to replace the old one that were “open aired” and run down exposing the children to the weather elements.  He tried to refuse to go to the ceremony honoring him but his commanding general ordered him to go.  From Japan his next station was West Point Military Academy in New York.  MSgt O’Reilly and Yuko had six children, 5 sons and one daughter.  He passed away at his home in Hawaii at the age of 91 due to natural causes.

This man was a true hero both militarily and in the eyes of the Holy Family Orphanage in Osaka, Japan.  First he was a hero in World War II and Korea.  What he did for the orphanage far outshined and was more impressive than what he did in war.  The Wolfhounds, thanks to a Japanese benefactor, Mr. Akio Aoyama, still support the Holy Family Orphanage and each year children visit the Wolfhounds in Hawaii during their summer vacation.

For a job well done good and faithful soldier rest in peace until we all meet at the Throne of God.

Tribute by Mrs. Yuko O'Rielly, Don Devaney and Bob Proctor.


In Memoriam 
Honorary Sergeant Major of the Regiment 
Hugh O'Reilly
(27 August 1914 - 23 June 2006)

"Sgt. Maj. Hugh O'Reilly was a legend in his own time. He was a light to all of us in the 25th Division. That light has not gone out. That light will continue to burn for us by the example he set that we will strive to emulate, not only as a soldier but as a human being." Maj. Gen. Benjamin Mixon, 25th Infantry Division Commander.

"This one man changed the lives of hundreds of children. The 
Wolfhounds continue to support the Holy Family to this day." Gary Huber, Wolfpack President.

Hugh O'Reilly has been, and will continue to be an inspiration to generations of Wolfhounds.  Hugh passed away Friday at his home in Hawaii. He will be missed by all who knew him, and those who knew of him. Our hearts and prayers are with his wife, Yuko and their children and grandchildren.

Hugh O'Reilly was born in New York. At the age of eighteen he enlisted in the Army September 8, 1932 and was shipped to Hawaii where he spent three years. After his enlistment, he returned to New York and was discharged June 30, 1935.

January 24, 1942 after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, O'Reilly enlisted in the Marine Corps. He served with distinction as a member of an anti-aircraft outfit in New Caledonia, Guadalcanal and Guam. On December 11, 1945 he was discharged and returned to New York.

August 18, 1948, a week before his thirty-forth birthday, he once again enlisted in the Army. In June 1949, O'Reilly was ordered to Japan where he was assigned as the Platoon Sergeant for Baker Company, 27th Infantry Regiment at Camp Sakai -- about five miles from the city of Osaka. He would later serve as the Regimental Public Information sergeant.

On Christmas day 1949, he and a dozen other soldiers accompanied the Red Cross field representative to a holiday party at the Holy Family Home in Osaka. The orphanage was in bad shape. Upon his return to the camp, O'Reilly enlisted some soldiers from Baker Company and proposed to take up a collection on their next payday for the orphanage. O'Reilly and his men raised $143 and donated it to the orphanage on New Years Day.

By the time the following payday rolled around, O'Reilly had made the plight of the orphans know to every company in the regiment. Gradually the Wolfhounds came to adopt the orphanage and began collecting funds for the Holy Family Home on a regular basis.. For the next six months he spent five hours a day there helping the sisters repair the orphanage. He came to know the children, who called him "O'Reilly San". The Wolfhounds were one of the first regiments sent to the Korean War, but their support of the Holy Family Home continued throughout the war. Hollywood portrayed O'Reilly and the Holy Family Home in the movie "Three Stripes in the Sun."

Shortly after Korea, O'Reilly was reassigned to Fort Monmouth, New Jersey and then West Point, New York. Soon, O'Reilly was back with the Wolfhounds at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. By order of the Secretary of the Army, he was permanently assigned to the 27th Infantry. He remained with the Wolfhounds until his retirement February 28, 1962.

The Army designated SGM O'Reilly as the first Honorary Sergeant Major of the 27th Infantry Regiment in the early 1980s. He took to the job with gusto, inspiring Wolfhounds for more than 20 years. He and his lovely wife could often be found with the soldiers from both battalions where he remained active in the ongoing traditions of the Wolfhounds and the Holy Family Home. 

Hugh O'Reilly is forever intertwined with our regiment's history as one of the regiment's greatest hero's.

Hugh, we will miss you but never forget you!

Jim Malachowski
Association Historian
BRONZE STAR MEDAL
PURPLE HEART MEDAL
ARMY COMMENDATION MEDAL
ARMY GOOD CONDUCT MEDAL WITH THREE LOOPS
AMERICAN CAMPAIGN MEDAL
ASIATIC PACIFIC CAMPAIGN MEDAL WITH BRONZE SERVICE STAR
Commemorative Coin Obverse and Reverrse sides honoring Hugh F. O'Reilly, Mr. Akie Aoyama, the Holy Family Home in Osaka, Japan and the 27th Infantry Regiment.

Msgt. Hugh O'Reilly earned the following decorations in his career.

With the Marines the American Campaign Medal, Asiatic Pacific Campaign Medal with Bronze Service Star (for participation in the Marianas Operation) and the World War II Victory Medal.
With the Army the Bronze Star Medal, Army Commendation Medal, Army Good conduct Medal with Bronze Clasp with three loops, Army of Occupation Medal (Japan), Korean Service Medal with five Bronze Service Stars, United Nations Service Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Combat Infantryman Badge, Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation and eight Overseas Service Bars.
ARMYOF OCCUPATION MEDAL (JAPAN)
KOREAN SERVICE MEDAL
UNITED NATIONS SERVICE MEDAL
NATIONAL DEFENCE SERVICE MEDAL
REPUBLIC OF KOREA PRESIDENTIAL UNIT CITATION
COMBAT INFANTRYMAN BADGE
OVERSEAS SERVICE BARS WWII AND KOREA
SILVER STAR MEDAL
BRONZE STAR MEDAL (COULDN'T FIND ONE WITH THREE BRONZE SERVICE STARS
LEGION OF MERIT MEDAL
COULDN'T FIND ONE WITH ONE SILVER SERVICE STAR
BRITISH DSO MEDAL
2 BRONZE STARS MEDALS WITH V
It is a tribute to a great man by a great man! 
I was only 17 when I first “met” General Zwicker.  He was on TV testifying before Sen. Joe McCarthy.  Joe was called derisively “Tailgunner Joe” for his fake WWII service.  McCarthy was so disrespectful toward General Zwicker that the nation turned on McCarthy.  He said Zwicker “was not fit to wear the uniform” in one of Joe’s anti-communist tirades.  It seems that Zwicker was the CG at Fort Monmouth and one of the dentist there, an Army Captain, was separated at ETS and given an honorable discharge “By Order of the Commander” like all of them are.  Joe said the guy was a Commie and at the hearings lashed out against Zwicker.  Zwicker was cool as a cucumber.

Later that year I entered the US Army and was myself at Fort Dix which was near the site of the hearings or maybe the actual site.  Lo and behold in October I shipped out and in November was assigned to the 561st MP Company (Svc) at Camp Otsu, Southwestern Command.  Ralph Zwicker was the CG and the Army was so proud of his performance in the face of McCarthy they promoted him to Major General.

I returned to Camp B this year and was the guest of honor of the installation JGSDF Commanding Officer.  He assigned an escort officer for me to tour the base after a huge parade with simulated battles including airborne; helicopters; and artillery.  The most impressive demonstration of military power I ever witnessed.  The escort officer took me to my old barracks and to a small museum depicting the history of Camp Otsu (A and B).  General Zwicker’s picture was there.
Don Devaney
Photo By Michael Robert Patterson, May 2008

GENERAL RALPH L. ZWICKER AND CUB SCOUTS
PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN

LIEUTENANT COLONEL RALPH LATHROP ZWICKER

17 June 1929 to 3 June 2008
His last residence was in Bangor, Washington and he passed away in Silverdale Washington. While living he was visited by CWO Retired Curtis Poree and his wife Mutsuko in Bangor, Washington. Curtis told me they had a good visit.

Lieutenant Colonel Ralph Lathrop Zwicker was the son of Maj. Gen. Ralph Wise Zwicker. He entered the United States military Academy in 1949 and dropped out in 1950 reason unknown. On 6 June 1951 he enlisted in the United States Army.

Dates of Service: 6 June 1951 to 27 April 1952 enlisted, 28 April 1952 to 31 July 1975 officer. 

On 8 June 1951 he was stationed in Germany APO 872 as a PVT. E-2 in casual status. On 17 June 1951 he was transferred to APO 69 in Germany in casual status. 

On 29 June 1951 he was transferred to Camp Kilmer NJ to the 1277th Ary Service Unit (ASU) Detachment (Det) 14 for reassignment. On 30 July 1951 he was assigned to A Battary (BATY). 26th Field Artillary (FA) Battalion (BN). Fort Dix for Leadership Training. 

On 20 October 1951 he was placed on casual status and promoted to Sgt. awaiting a slot in Officers Candidate School (OCS). On 4 November 1951 he was assigned to the 4th Officers Candidate (OC) Company (CO). 1st OC Bn. 2nd Student Records (SR) Fort Benning GA as OC student. On 1 April 1952 he was transferred to the 4th OC Co. 1st OC BN. 1st OC Regiment (REG). Fort Benning GA as a student. On 27 April 1952 he was discharged C of G to accept a commission in 2nd Reserve Component. Commission authorized by President Harry S. Truman 28 April 1952.

Weapons Qualification: 
With the M1 Rifle he fired expert with a score of 504 4 December 1951.
With the Carbine Course A he didn't qualifiy scoring 114 5 December 1951.
With the Light Machine Gun Course A expert score 8 15 January 1952.
With the 75mm Rifle Course C Second Class Gun score 101 7 February 1952.
With the 57mm Rifle Course C Second Class Gun score 96 8 February 1952.

As a 1st Lieutenant he was the Company Commander of B CO. 1st BN. 7th Cavalry REG 1 Cavalry Division, at Camp Otsu APO 9 from 1956 to 1957.

Decorations and Awards:









    Bronze Star          Meritorious   Joint Service      Army Commendation
      Medal              Service Medal Commendation       Medal with Oak
                                 with Oak           Medal                  Leaf Cluster
                               Leaf Cluster

Army Campaign Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster (No Photos) 









National Defense   Korean Service            Vietnam           United Nations 
  Service Medal            Medal                Service Medal        Service Medal









             
           
              Republic of Vietnam                 Republic of Vietnam 
               Campaign Medal                     Gallantry Cross Unit
                                                                         with Palm

 




              General Staff                         2 Overseas bars
         Identification Badge


Citation
(SECOND OAK LEAF CLUSTER)
LIEUTENANT COLONEL RALPH L. ZWICKER  FIELD ARTILLERY
Outstanding meritorious service as Division Advisor, 38th Infantry Division Artillery, Indiana Army National Guard, Indianapolis Indiana, from June 1973 to July 1975. Of special significance were Lieutenant Colonel Zwicker's efforts in obtaining, in cooperation with Redstone Arsenal, updated launchers and in handling unit for the Honest John Battalion. Lieutenant Colonel Zwicker conducted an extensive inspection of all firing equipment in the Division which revealed more than 40% of the instruments to be unserviceable or in need of  major repair. Consequently, Lieutenant Colonel Zwicker immediately initiated action which resulted in a rewrite of a USPFO regulation clarifying the use of Issue Priority Designators at unit level. This effort helped to get critical items repaired or replaced. Lieutenant Colonel Zwicker's exemplary performance of duty reflect great credit upon himself, US Arm Readiness Region VI and the US Army.
3rd July 75

WILLARD W. SCOTT, JR.
Major General, USA
Commanding, US Army Readiness
Region VI
GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN
The Wolfhounds have continued to support this Legacy since it began in 1949. Each year -- despite deployments -- they host four children from the Holy Family Home for Summer Visits, and at Christmas send gifts (for all the children) and soldiers to the home.


I can say that in the six years since we started Peace Bridge I have been continually amazed at the dedication, honor and commitment of Wolfhounds. I have had the distinct pleasure of meeting and working with a succession of battalion commanders and it seems that each new colonel is more impressive than the last.


I would be happy to share more insights if you would like. Feel free to contact me any time.


And thank you again for doing such great work! 
 
Hugh O'Reilly Jr.

AWARDS AND DECORATIONS
SILVER STAR MEDAL
4 PURPLE HEART MEDALS
ARMY GOOD CONDUCT MEDAL WITH FOUR LOOPS
KOREAN SERVICE MEDAL
UNITED NATIONS SERVICE MEDAL
NATIONAL DEFENSE SERVICE MEDAL
VIETNAM SERVICE MEDAL
VIETNAM CAMPAIGN MEDAL
VIETNAM CROSS OF GALLANTRY WITH PALM
COMBAT INFANTRYMAN'S BADGE WITH STAR

Albert LuscherThursday, 4/7/16, 9:42 PM
 
Sergeant Christopher Garland was my Platoon Sergeant in Viet Nam. I was in the Feb 6th 1968 conflict with him when he was awarded the Silver Star. I was awarded the Army Commendation Medal with V Device as a result of that combat action. As a 2nd Lt. Sgt Garland "got my feet wet" when I arrived in Viet Nam and took over the 3rd Platoon of C Co2/8th,4th Inf Division. I lost contact with Sgt Garland when we returned to the States; but never forgot him. A Great and Honorable Leader and Soldier.
 
From:Newnan, Georgia
Email:AKL1945@yahoo.com

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Third Platoon photo with Sgt Garland and Lt Luscher taken by Larry Dobbs